SF bans water bottles

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San Francisco continues to lead the way in the nation's environmental policy, with the Board of Supervisors on March 4 voting unanimously to bar the city from buying plastic water bottles and to ban distribution of plastic water bottles smaller than 21 ounces on city property starting Oct. 1. The ban excludes city marathons and other sporting events.

"We all know with climate change, and the importance of combating climate change, San Francisco has been leading the way to fight for our environment," Board President David Chiu, who authored the legislation, said at the hearing. "That's why I ask you to support this ordinance to reduce and discourage single-use, single-serving plastic water bottles in San Francisco."

Chiu held up a water bottle at the board meeting, a quarter of the way full with oil, to illustrate how much oil is used in the production and transport of plastic water bottles. He also reminded San Franciscans that the current fad of buying bottled water only started in the 1990s when the bottled water industry mounted a huge ad campaign that got Americans buying bottled water.

Somehow, Chiu noted, "for centuries, everybody managed to stay hydrated." (Francisco Alvarado)

Mass action against Keystone XL

Nine environmental activists were arrested in San Francisco for marching through the financial district and entering One Spear Tower on March 3, the building that houses local offices of the State Department, to express opposition to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.

A day earlier, a mass protest against the oil pipeline was staged outside the White House in Washington, D.C. Roughly 200 protesters were arrested after using plastic zip ties to lock themselves to the White House fence.

Meanwhile, thousands more have made a vow — at least in the sense of clicking to add their name to a petition — to engage in peaceful civil disobedience if President Barack Obama grants ultimate approval for the oil infrastructure project, which would transport 830,000 barrels of crude oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast.

Nonprofit Credo Action has created an online petition urging people to get ready to respond with peaceful civil disobedience if the pipeline wins final approval. (Rebecca Bowe)

City weighs lawsuit over Airbnb

The San Francisco City Attorney's Office is finally preparing to take action against the illegal short-term housing rentals facilitated by Airbnb, something we've been hearing that the Examiner also reported on March 6 ("SF landlords could face legal fight over rentals on Airbnb, other services"), an action that would address the company's apparent stall tactics.

Despite a business model that violates a variety of San Francisco laws — most notably zoning, planning, and tenant regulations — and Airbnb's flagrant flouting of a two-year-old city ruling that it should be collecting and paying the city's transient occupancy tax (see "Into thin air," Aug.

Comments

own use. The rest of us can and will continue to have the free choices that consumers deserve.

This is more joke legislation from the supervisors who, seemingly, have nothing to do most of the time.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 11, 2014 @ 2:42 pm

free choice? is this what free choice is about… thanks for demeaning the freedom to choose

Posted by Guest on Mar. 13, 2014 @ 5:34 pm

something even if it is harmful to you

Posted by Guest on Mar. 13, 2014 @ 5:50 pm

Or freedom to harm others - I don't think so. Very rarely do our actions only affect ourselves. Using a scarce commodity (oil) to market an unnecessary product (filtered municipal water) is irresponsible. Recycling attitudes are a joke. The bottled water industry lobbies against deposits to encourage recycling and consumers of bottled drinks mostly don't care about the planet.

Posted by Ian Faulkner on Mar. 15, 2014 @ 2:01 pm

harm others. So things like smoking and drinking harm only me, and that's my problem - not yours.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 15, 2014 @ 2:15 pm

it becomes everyone's problem when people don't see it's not just themselves they are harming. it's not just your own physical body these things affect. think about the effects of production, of waste & disposal, and also the social harm involved.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 16, 2014 @ 9:06 pm

I haven't met a single person who doesn't do SOMETHING that harms other people. Should we ban everything then?

Posted by Greg on Mar. 16, 2014 @ 10:34 pm

Then you drink out of that public filtered water spout, especially knowing what people do to water fountains. Spitting in the spout, sticking rocks in the spout, dog owners who let their dog drink from the fountain slobbering all over that "clean" water. Its easy to change when your not the one affected...

Posted by Guest on Mar. 27, 2014 @ 11:08 pm

Bring your own filtered water from home using a re-usable plastic bottle, they cost about $8.

Posted by Hilary on Apr. 17, 2014 @ 7:46 pm

Try thinking a little bit outside of the box before you say ignorant, narrow minded things.
For one thing, ever heard of a thing called second hand smoke?

Posted by Guest on Mar. 26, 2014 @ 1:39 am

it becomes our problem through second hand smoke and poor decision making while you are intoxicated. use your head...

Posted by guest on Mar. 27, 2014 @ 5:41 pm

Bottled water only harms:
The countries where water and other resources are depleted to obtain the fossil fuels used to make the bottles:
The communities where the water table or groundwater supplies are depleted to fill the bottles:
The atmosphere that is polluted by the emissions from the vehicles used to transport the bottles to the store;
And the communities that have the bottles after they're used. That means either Third World countries who recycle the bottles, landfills where the bottles will sit for an untold amount of time, sea life who consume the bottle after it photo-degrades, or the atmosphere which is polluted when it is burned.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 28, 2014 @ 7:03 am

I'm confused. Is there not a recycling program in San Francisco? Because I've always thought those single-serving plastic bottles were recyclable. At least, we recycle them where I live.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 11, 2014 @ 5:35 pm

Usually not all the plastic gets recycled (you depend on people actually doing the separation) and even if it does there's a huge amount of energy used for that process. Also, production and transport of plastic bottles uses huge amounts of oil, which is why it's more efficient to stop using plastic bottles in the first place.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 13, 2014 @ 3:01 am

Single use plastic bottles are meant to be just that - single use. Even reusing them yourself releases nasty chemicals into the liquids you may drink.

A more sustainable way to drink would be from a BPA-free stainless steel water bottle such as a GiveMeTap bottle. They are a company in London who are creating a water network of cafes and restaurants who have signed up to give tap water to people on the go - no hassle or questions. You should definitely check them out as this would be such a great thing to start in San Fran.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 14, 2014 @ 2:30 am

PUT A PICTURE if you want this article to receive more viewership? SIMPLE.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 12, 2014 @ 3:26 am

In the 90s more people became aware that fluoridating the water was actually a political backscratch for chemical companies to cheaply dispose and make money off of highly toxic and difficult to dispose waste material. Despite the fact that it has no actual health benefits and might actually cause calcification of the penal gland.

Stop fluoridating the water and I'll stop drinking bottled water, fluoride filters are very expensive.

Posted by that guy on Mar. 12, 2014 @ 11:00 am

"Fluoridation is the most monstrously conceived and dangerous communist plot we have ever had to face." - General Ripper...Sorry I'm a Dr. Strangelove fan :)

Posted by April on Mar. 12, 2014 @ 1:38 pm

I hate to tell you there's fluoride in your bottled water I purchased a Berkey with fluoride filters will save a ton from not having to buy the bottled crap from nestle if you don't know what I mean look up CEO of Nestlé saying water isn't a human right and should be classified as a food stuff and sold as such

Posted by Guest on Mar. 12, 2014 @ 6:53 pm

This is just another case of real deal Hypocrisy! Mr. David Chiu states drinking bottled water is a “fad and only started in the 90’s because of a giant marketing campaign” He also says that we managed to stay hydrated well before the 90’s and is suggesting San Francisco’s people don’t need fresh water. I guess Mr. Chiu thinks drinking Coke, Pepsi and related poisonous beverages in “single” plastic bottles is cool. If you are going to start a war on plastic bottles, fresh drinking water should be the last ones’ attacked.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 13, 2014 @ 7:07 am

This is retarded government control. so let me see... I buy a bolgna hero and a chocolate brownie. What can't get water, ok give me that pepsi. Oh and throw in a carton of Camels while you're at it. Seems like keeping that plastic water bottle away from me is a giant stride to saving the ozone and curing cancer. What am i missing, sure someone will enlighten me.

Posted by dwags 60 on Mar. 15, 2014 @ 8:32 am

Although I do agree with the fact that it seems demeaning to the health of Americans to ban only water bottles, while still allowing the sale of plastic soda bottles to continue. But that doesn't mean that the ban on disposable soda bottles is not next to come.
I still feel that many of the people who have commented on this article are understanding it poorly.
I believe that the San Fran government is seeking to minimize the useless and wasteful ecological impact of water bottles. Not at all to "limit the freedoms of Americans." If the Internet relays it’s facts justly, bottled water production in the U.S. alone burns enough crude oil to keep a MILLION cars on the road for an entire year.
Really how difficult, and limiting is it to carry around a reusable water bottle for when you want water? Almost pathetic how lazy people argue that they are "losing their freedoms" because they aren't willing carry around a water bottle with them.
Good on the San Fran Government!!

Posted by t_whitle on Mar. 18, 2014 @ 7:39 am

No wonder America has such an awful reputation. You lot are all idiots.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 26, 2014 @ 1:42 am

Bottled water only harms:
The countries where water and other resources are depleted to obtain the fossil fuels used to make the bottles:
The communities where the water table or groundwater supplies are depleted to fill the bottles:
The atmosphere that is polluted by the emissions from the vehicles used to transport the bottles to the store;
And the communities that have the bottles after they're used. That means either Third World countries who recycle the bottles, landfills where the bottles will sit for an untold amount of time, sea life who consume the bottle after it photo-degrades, or the atmosphere which is polluted when it is burned.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 28, 2014 @ 7:06 am

If you drink Kangen water it will be a huge savings plus you reduce the bottles and improve health with the perfect ph balance of this Alkaline micro-clustered water. If you want more information I'm willing to help.

Posted by Guest on Jul. 09, 2014 @ 4:23 am

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