New direction - Page 2

SF Film Society head Noah Cowan settles into the job — and eagerly awaits his first SFIFF

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A man, a plan: Noah Cowan looks forward to shaping SFFS' future.
PHOTO BY GEORGE PIMENTEL, WIREIMAGE/GETTY FOR TIFF

There are certain holdovers from my role in Toronto, where we built a crazy big building, [the TIFF Bell Lightbox, which opened in 2010]. There's nothing else like it in the world of film, and I had the great honor and privilege of being able to oversee the artistic life of that building. Maybe some things that we did there aren't going to translate here, but some of them will. We engaged in a lot of pilots in education and film-community outreach that taught me some valuable lessons about how those can and can't work, and what's changed about education now that we're in the digital world.

In addition, I've learned the pros and cons of having your own theater space. While I'm highly optimistic that we'll have alliances in the future where we'll be able to have a year-round screening presence, I'm going to be pretty cautious about how we go about that from a business perspective.

SFBG SFFS already has several special presentations and mini-festivals throughout the year (Taiwan Film Days, French Cinema Now, etc.) When you say "year-round," do you mean an increase in programming? Weekly screenings?

NC What would exactly happen in that theater is still a question. Maybe it's just these small festivals that we have. I think there's something about being associated with a permanent space, even if you don't own it, that is really important for a film institution — to really be anchored. Film is kind of a retail business in a funny way, and while festivals are the Black Friday of film going, you need to have a sustainable relationship with your audience to be able to grow it, and to have them trust you to follow different pathways.

SFBG Fortunately, like Toronto, San Francisco has a built-in audience of film fanatics.

NC It's interesting here — it's more diffuse environment. While there are a lot of film festivals in Toronto, there are a million in San Francisco and in the Bay Area in general, and there's positives and negatives about that. When I have a second, after our festival, I'm looking forward to reaching out and understanding the needs of other film organizations in the city, and how we might be able to help. So far, this has felt like a city that really welcomes collaboration, so I hope we'll be able to have some really exciting conversations.

SFBG What are you most excited about at this year's SFIFF?

NC I really like this festival. There are a number of terrific films. I really like Rachel Rosen's taste! Very much like the Toronto festival, the San Francisco festival is really focused on audiences: what kind of audiences are going to be interested in what kinds of films, and in general, an eye to audience enjoyment in the selections, even for films that are on the difficult side. There's a thoughtfulness to the kinds of responses that the programmers would like to elicit, which really fits in with my own philosophies of why film festivals and film organizations are generally on the planet.

In terms of individual films, there are some films that I've championed before that are here, like Roberto Minervini's Stop the Pounding Heart, or James Franco's Child of God, which I was the programmer of this past year in Toronto. I'm happy to see them again! And then there's some new work, particularly in the documentary area, that really impresses me — films like Art and Craft and Burt's Buzz, which are really strong and really accessible.

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